$20-$40

Sushiro, Lido Shaw: Affordable, No Frill Kaiten-zushi Chain (Conveyor Belt Sushi Restaurant), Better Than Others at This Price Range

Founded since 1984, Sushiro topped the Kaiten-zushi Chain (Conveyor Belt Sushi Restaurant) sales in Japan for 8 consecutive years (2011-2018). It has over 530 outlets in Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Korea.

They serve over 100 varieties of sushi and other Japanese dishes to about 150 million customers every year. Now Sushiro has three outlets in Singapore: Tiong Bahru Plaza, Lido Shaw, and Causeway Point.

there is self-service free water but if you pay $3.50, you can get free-flow of interesting soft drinks.

The reason for its popularity is due to its affordability. In Japan, a plate of sushi goes for only 100yen (S$1.30). But in Singapore, the cheapest plate starts at $2.20. The other plates are priced at $3.20 and $4.80.

Assorted sushi including ikura (salmon roe), otoro (fat tuna belly), negitoro (minced tuna).

They have a Sushiro Singapore app which allows you to make reservations in advance or you will have to queue for some time since it’s a very popular restaurant. It is worth downloading the app to avoid the queue.

Negitoro (minced tuna)

Everything is very high-tech, neat, and clean here. The food is clearly labeled so that you know what sushi you’re eating.

The conveyor belt has two level: the first level is for the usual food, the second level is for food you order through the electronic menu. This second level is individualised so your food will definitely come to you.

otoro (fatty tuna belly)

Another thing to note is there is limited service here. Most things are self-service or done through the electronic menu. It was our first time here and we didn’t know there is free water (self service) so we ordered the free-flow of soft drinks ($3.50).

If you’re a teenager, the soft drinks is a good option because the drinks are interesting such as mango 7-up, lychee 7-up, etc, drinks that I don’t see elsewhere. But if you’re middle age like me, they are much too sweet.

Ankimo (monk fish liver)

They have the conventional, normal sushi such as salmon. But I highly recommended the usually-expensive items: ikura (salmon roe), negitoro (minced tuna), ankimo (monk fish liver) and otoro. I once had a piece of otoro for $45, so $4.80 for a piece is quite worth it, although you shouldn’t expect super high quality. I especially like their negitoro: fatty and not slimy.

Clockwise from top left: White tuna, salmon, mackeral, ebi tempura roll

They also the usual sushi selection, including white tuna. You may not know that white tuna may damage the liver so I advice you to eat it once in 4 years. If you haven’t tried it before, try it once.

Pork belly

Roast beef sushi

fish tempura sushi – how do you eat this?

They also have novelty sushi like roast beefpork belly, and fish tempura. The first two are bleah. But the fish tempura is really fun. it’s a big piece of fish fillet (similar to the size you get for fish and chips), so the fun lies in how you eat it.

Uni ramen – expectations vs reality

The uni ramen ($8.50) is ok, not amazing but not terrible.

Comparing Sushiro to other conveyer belt restaurants at the same price range (Sushi Express, Genki Sushi, etc), Sushiro is much better in terms of quality and range. But to be honest, I think if I want budget sushi, I’ll just get supermarket sushi.

We spent $73 for two persons. We overate. Most people would probably pay $20 – $30.


Sushiro
Shaw House #03-K1/K2, 350 Orchard Rd, Singapore 238868
Sun – Th, 11am – 9pm, F & Sat 11am – 9.30pm
facebook
other outlets: Tiong Bahru Plaza and Causeway Point

Food: 6/10
Price: 6/10
Service: 6/10
Decor: 6.75/10


You may be interested in…
BOTAN Japanese Restaurant, Far East Square: 20-year-old Restaurant Gets a New Chef with 40 Years of Experience
TEN Sushi by Marusaya, Robertson Quay: For Late-night Sushi Cravings
Seizan Uni Ramen @ Picnic Food Park, Wisma Atria: They Use Spring Water from Mt Fuji to Make This Ramen!
Una Una @ Bugis+: Cheapest Charcoal-Grilled Unagi Don in Singapore


Written by Dr. A. Nathanael Ho.

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